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The Chongqing municipal government has made a high profile intervention in an attempt to end the taxi drivers’ strike that erupted on 3 November. The intervention came as teachers in Chongqing’s Qijiang county ended an eight day strike over pay and conditions. Photo of Chongqing taxi by DCF pics @ flickr.com
Factory closures and rising unemployment are forcing increasing numbers of migrant workers to return home. In response, some of China’s traditional labour exporting regions are now helping migrant workers find employment locally and providing them with incentives to open new businesses. Photograph by monkeyking@ flickr.com
There are 110 million migrant workers in China aged between 16 and 40 years old.  They left home in the hope of building a better life for themselves and their family, yet when they start a family of their own, they are faced with a stark choice; either take their children to the cities and subject them to institutionalized discrimination, or leave them behind in the countryside in the uncert
One year after the Shanxi brickyard slave labour scandal, many reportedly freed slaves have not yet returned home, others are forced to beg for a living, officials who failed in their duty of care are still on the job, and the slave traffickers and slave factories are still in business.
On Wednesday, 5 March 2008, three migrant workers entered the Great Hall of the People in Beijing as deputies to this year's National People's Congress (NPC). China's official media hailed the "election" of these deputies as a "symbolic and significant" development. 
China Labour Bulletin appears in this article. Copyright remains with the original publisher Sunday March 2 2008 By John Ruwitch and Lindsay Beck
China Labour Bulletin appears in the following article. Copyright remains with the original publisher. December 23, 2007 By David Lague
Prior to China’s economic reforms of the late 1970s, the central government in Beijing exerted strict controls over the economy, all enterprises were publicly owned and managed, and all staff deployed according to the political and economic interests of the state. Enterprises were required to submit profits to the central government, and workers’ salaries were determined by the state.
CLB has translated in full a set of internal regulations issued by the Ministry of Public Security that provide detailed guidelines for local police in handling the increasing number of public protests, known as "collective incidents," by citizens across China.
CLB has translated in full a set of internal regulations issued by the Ministry of Public Security that provide detailed guidelines for local police in handling the increasing number of public protests, known as "collective incidents," by citizens across China.

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