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Many strikers at the Yue Yuen shoe factory complex in Dongguan to have returned to work after the company made several concessions and the local authorities increased pressure on the workers to accept the deal on the table.
A Chinese labor activist has been freed after being detained for more than two days by security agents who he says tried to convince him not to make contact with workers involved in China's biggest strike in years.
A local government in China has determined that the world’s largest manufacturer of sports shoes which supplies Adidas and Nike should reimburse striking workers for underpaying their pension contributions over many years.
After more than 300 days in detention, Wu Guijun was in remarkably good spirits as his trial resumed in Shenzhen on 4 April 2014.As three police officers walked the slimly-built 41-year-old Wu into the courtroom, he was greeted with a round of applause from the 30 friends and co-workers who had come to show their support.
Wu Guijun, a 40-year-old migrant worker and father of two, has been detained for nearly five months and faces possible criminal prosecution after staging protests against his employer and petitioning the local government in Shenzhen.  
China’s long hot summer saw workers across the country stage strikes and protests against low pay, wage arrears and poor working conditions. In the three months from June to August 2013, CLB recorded a total of 183 incidents on our Strike Map, more than double the 89 incidents recorded from June to August in 2012. Photo: Women workers on strike in Dongguan from Weibo.
More than 100 workers at the Huizhou subsidiary of a major piling manufacturer have reportedly detained five senior managers for five days in a bid to ensure that an estimated 1.2 million yuan in wage arrears was paid in full.
As collective bargaining begins to gain traction in China, the need to support workers who are willing to stand up and represent their colleagues is increasingly apparent. By Photografiti.
The head of the Communist Party in Hunan has told reporters from Hong Kong that an investigation into the suspicious death of veteran labour activist Li Wangyang in early June had concluded that Li took his own life, the South China Morning Post reported today. Zhou Qiang claimed that Li’s family accepted the verdict but this has not been confirmed because his family and their supporters have been threatened by the authorities, kept under house arrest or disappeared soon after their campaign for justice was launched.  
The suspicious death of Chinese labour activist Li Wangyang on 6 June has triggered a wave of anger and massive demonstrations here in Hong Kong, putting pressure on the Chinese government for a special investigation into his death and the torture he suffered during his 21 years’ in prison.

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