You are here

In January 2009, a young man working in Shanghai returned to his home village in Anhui for the Spring Festival. He recorded his observations in a blog, which sheds light on the life facing the millions of rural migrants returning home after losing their jobs in the cities. Photo of rural Anhui by Toby Simkin
China Labour Bulletin appears in the following article. Copyright remains with the original publisher. 2009-03-09 China's women have legal protection against workplace discrimination—at least in theory, they say.
Labour related lawsuits nearly doubled last year, reflecting the sharp increase in factory closures and wage defaults, workers increased awareness of their rights and their willingness to seek redress for rights violations through the judicial system. Shen Deyong, vice-president of the Supreme People’s Court, told a Beijing press conference on 3 March that the number of labor-related lawsuits filed in 2008 jumped by 95 percent compared with 2007, the largest increase for all types of lawsuit.
Juvenile crime now accounts for one third of all crime in China, with migrant youths being the main perpetrators, new figures from the Supreme People’s Court show. The figures clearly highlight the failure of China’s social welfare system to adequately care for migrant workers and their children. Photo by Joshtrix
CLB presents a detailed examination of the current struggle for workers’ rights in China at an international conference to mark the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights which opened in Paris on 4 December. Photo by Saad Akhtar.
A Dongguan court on 22 October 2008 ruled against a plaintiff who was seeking 500,000 yuan in psychological damages after being refused employment at Nokia (China) because of his Hepatitis B (HBV) status. However, key evidence was not heard by the court.
The Dongguan Intermediate People’s Court on 22 October 2008 ruled against a plaintiff who was seeking 500,000 yuan in psychological damages after being refused employment at Nokia (China) because of his Hepatitis B (HBV) status.
Shenzhen’s new residence card has been heralded in the official Chinese media as an important step towards the elimination of discrimination against migrant workers. CLB contends that it is little more than a cosmetic exercise that only really benefits the police. Photograph by 2dogs @ flickr.com
An open letter from China Labour Bulletin to Jorma Ollila, Chairman of the Board of Directors, Nokia Corporation, concerning Hepatitis B discrimination at a Nokia plant in China. Photograph of Nokia store in Shanghai by PierrickBlons
There are 110 million migrant workers in China aged between 16 and 40 years old.  They left home in the hope of building a better life for themselves and their family, yet when they start a family of their own, they are faced with a stark choice; either take their children to the cities and subject them to institutionalized discrimination, or leave them behind in the countryside in the uncert

Pages

Subscribe to Discrimination