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The central government in Beijing last week sent an investigative team to Fengyang county in Anhui to examine media claims that at least 12 migrant workers from Yunnan have died from silicosis after working in the county’s stone crushing mills. Fengyang officials claimed there was as yet insufficient evidence to prove that the Yunnan workers contracted silicosis from breathing in silica dust while blasting and crushing slabs of rock in the county’s factories.
The global economic crisis has prompted several Chinese officials to make short-sighted comments. However, none have been more damaging than ACFTU Vice-Chair Sun Chunlan’s claim that the union needs to guard against hostile forces infiltrating the ranks of migrant workers. Photo by Saad Akhtar.
Labour related lawsuits nearly doubled last year, reflecting the sharp increase in factory closures and wage defaults, workers increased awareness of their rights and their willingness to seek redress for rights violations through the judicial system. Shen Deyong, vice-president of the Supreme People’s Court, told a Beijing press conference on 3 March that the number of labor-related lawsuits filed in 2008 jumped by 95 percent compared with 2007, the largest increase for all types of lawsuit.
China Labour Bulletin appears in the following article. Copyright remains with the original publisher.Feb 23, 2009 04:30 AM Moira Welsh
China Labour Bulletin appears in the following article. Copyright remains with the original publisher.
CLB presents a detailed examination of the current struggle for workers’ rights in China at an international conference to mark the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights which opened in Paris on 4 December. Photo by Saad Akhtar.
China  Labour  Bulletin  appears  in  this article. Copyright remains with the original publisher Elise Potaka, Beijing October 4, 2008
There are 110 million migrant workers in China aged between 16 and 40 years old.  They left home in the hope of building a better life for themselves and their family, yet when they start a family of their own, they are faced with a stark choice; either take their children to the cities and subject them to institutionalized discrimination, or leave them behind in the countryside in the uncert
China  Labour  Bulletin  appears  in  this article. Copyright remains with the original publisher Tom Mitchell
One year after the Shanxi brickyard slave labour scandal, many reportedly freed slaves have not yet returned home, others are forced to beg for a living, officials who failed in their duty of care are still on the job, and the slave traffickers and slave factories are still in business.

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